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of the millennium was the release. we see a dramatic revival in the use of monumental sculpture and large-scale architecture such as had only been glimpsed in the previous centuries. the cult of saints and the passion for pilgrimage to their shrines were dominant features of medieval culture. one of the most famous was the pilgrimage to santiago in spain. the church was believed to house a sacred rel of christendom-- the bones of saint james, santiago in spanish, one of christ's 12 apostles. from atop the tower at vezelay, you can still make out the old way of saint james, winding its way to spain. it's astonishing to think that hundreds of thousands of men and women made that pilgrimage during the medieval period. they undertook such arduous journeys for a multitude of reasons-- to plead for divine help, to ask for the cure of illness, to give thanks, to ask for penance. but above all they went for the salvation of their souls. to achieve the state of grace conferred by his relics, they traveled great distances on foot... by boat... on horseback... wearinge pical pilgrim'- the hat, the s
, the vatican condemns the media for what it calls us up and slander -- a gossip and slander. the spanish kings son-in-law is jeered by protesters as he faces a judge over fraud claims. uncertainty and frustration mounts venezuela at the opposition demands to know if president chavez is fit enough to rule. >serious main opposition said it is pulling out of talks -- syria's main opposition said it is pulling out of talks. it describes international silence over the destruction of aleppo. on friday, rocket attacks killed at least 29 people there and left other people trapped. >> people in the villages scrambled to pull this child from under a rubble after an airstrike. the essence he said is tired of the worlds in in action against bashar al-assad's government. -- the snc said it is tired of the world's in action against bashar al-assad's government. where the world stands on the conflict is shameful, they say. >> we are too busy gathering the remains of her children in aleppo to attend conferences. >> the snc has announced it a transitional government. >> leaders of the syrian national -- it is
, universal, you're right. universal, that gravity extends everywhere. and what this equation tells us? the equation of gravity just tells us that there's an attractive force, 'f' between all things and for any two things that attractive force depends upon, is proportional to, is related to the product of the masses of the two things. this might be a planet, one. this might be another planet, two. those two planets are tugging on each other with the force that depends very much on how much mass they have, but it also peters out with distance square. as the distance between those planets or those chunks of matter or those particles, as the distance between increases, guess what happens to the force? just what you would expect to happen. - larger or smaller? - smaller. how many say, "oh, it seems to me "as the planets get further and further away, they pull harder and harder on each other?" stand up, i wanna see what you look like. nobody say that. but you see, we can say that statement here mathematically by putting this downstairs, huh? as that make the distance big, what happens to th
. but is anyone listening? and can government intervention move us out of these terrible times? keynes and roosevelt met only once. each thought the other well meaning but ineffectual. however, they changed the course of the world. what did we learn from the depression? we'll investigate that with the help of economics analyst richard gill on economics usa. hard times. we've seen a lot of them over the years. 1932 and the years that followed were different. the hoover administration tried to popularize the word depression. they thought it a milder word that would soothe the american public. by 1932, hope was about gone. the depression was more than an economic problem. it was human calamity. millions went hungry, some to starvation. proud people begged on street corners asking for pennies to feed their children, for jobs that no longer existed. the economic devastation seemed total. things couldn't possibly get worse, and yet they did. over 4,000 banks failed. the value of stocks dropped from $89 billion to $15 billion. national income dropped. investment, savings, consumption-- everyt
history of excavation "had such an amazing sight been seen "as the light of our torch revealed to us: "strange animals, statues, and gold. "everywhere the glint of gold. "we had seen enough. "we reclosed the hole, mounted our donkeys, "and rode home down the valley, strangely silent and subdued." brown: the discovery of tutankhamun's tomb in 1922 had an instantaneous and shattering effect on the world's imagination that continues to this very day. extraordinary numbers of visitors descended upon the tomb--sometimes to the point where the excavators were unable to function. egyptian motifs swept through the world of fashion and design. ashe whole worldthrilled t, death and the supernatural seemed to gin to prey upon the excavators. lord carnarvon died first--from the bite of a mere mosquito. as death closed over him in april of 1923, only a few months after the opening of the tomb, the lights of cairo extinguished with him. stranger still, at the same instant in england, s dog gave a terrifying howl and died. then georges benedite, the head of egyptian antiquities at the louvre museum
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5